Posts tagged ‘diet’

THE LAW OF ABUNDANCE

Abund-danceWhen you diet, you are working against the law of abundance. We were born into an abundant universe. We were designed to operate in abundance. Like most living things, we flourish in times of abundance.

When you diet you are controlling, restricting, limiting, denying yourself. You are trying to restrict the quantity and control the quality of food you eat. You deny yourself all those yummy things you really love. It is a form of starvation. Your body immediately begins to think lack instead of abundance. When we have an abundance of food and feel secure that sufficient food will come to us on a regular basis, there is no need to store extras as fat. However, when we experience lack with respect to food our body goes into fat storage mode to protect us from the possibility of famine.

In the event of famine, storage of fat could make the difference between life and death. However, most of us in the Western world are in no danger of starving. It seems that the opposite is probably true – we eat too much. But it is empty, valueless food. It is refined, processed junk food that fails to meet our nutritional needs. Too much food, but too little nutrition. (See my blog “Overweight but Starving?” for more on this.) So again, we feel lack instead of abundance. Instead of feeling satisfied when we eat we crave more empty calories.

To live in harmony with the law of abundance I suggest you eat more real foods. What I mean by real foods is raw fruits, vegetables, nuts, grass-fed beef, free range chicken and fish. Don’t deprive yourself though. Don’t feel that you have to eat only these foods to the exclusion of all else. That is dieting and will set you up for failure. Instead ADD these real foods to your existing diet. Real food will fill you up and satisfy you. You will be less hungry, and when your body starts to get the nutrition that it requires it won’t crave those empty calories from processed junk foods so much.

That is why I am such a strong advocate of Low GI eating. You can enjoy a good range of foods, but they are good quality foods that will fill you up and satisfy you. You don’t have to measure, weigh or calculate anything, so you are not controlling, restricting, limiting and experiencing lack. You will gradually find yourself eating more real food and less processed food and your body will start to show the benefits. Low GI eating works in harmony with the law of abundance.

May 17, 2009 at 12:51 pm 1 comment

CHRONIC FATIGUE – NUTRITION

In my blog on chronic fatigue – diet – I talked about the importance of Low GI eating and how cutting out sugars helped. However, all the things I tried put together didn’t give me a turn around to recovery. But there is one thing which did give me a sudden and marked improvement, and that is the addition of glyconutrients to my diet. If you would like to know more about glyconutrients and what they are, I have done a couple of blogs entitled “Sugars that heal? That doesn’t sound right” and “More about glyconutrients”, so I suggest you go have a read of these blogs, as I won’t repeat that information here.

How did I hear about glyconutrients? I was at the point of desperation. I was still working full time, but not really managing to keep up with the house and/or the kids. I had just come to the conclusion that I would have to give up full time work and drop back to part time hours because I knew I wasn’t really coping. I was sharing with a counsellor how hard I was finding life. She knew someone who had recovered from chronic fatigue after taking glyconutrients, and she gave me the contact details. I met with Elizabeth the next day and after hearing her story started taking glyconutrients that night. Elizabeth warned me that my body could initially have a negative reaction as it started to clear itself of toxins and get the immune system working again. She also emphasised that glyconutrients are a food to the body, not a drug. So I was not to expect any “miracle cure” from taking glyconutrients – my body would work through its own healing process in its own time. Since we are all individuals it is hard to predict how someone’s body will respond.

I was delighted to find that my body responded immediately, and positively. The first thing I noticed was that the mental fogginess lifted. You know that feeling you have when you’ve got a cold and your head is all stuffed up – you feel like your head is packed with cotton wool and your brain just won’t function properly.  I had always been an efficient and organised person at work, and I really minded the fact that I could no longer perform well. Within two weeks of starting to take glyconutrients I started to feel more like my old self. At last I could concentrate and remember! What a relief! I didn’t actually get ANY negative reaction from glyconutrients. It was as if my body just loved it and put it immediately to work.

I quickly started to feel less physically tired, but the physical healing has taken place gradually. It was 2004 when I got sick, and my first major milestone in recovery was completing the 53 kilometre “Great Bike Ride” in November 2007. That was something I couldn’t have done BEFORE I got chronic fatigue, but it was my first confirmation that I was really well after having had chronic fatigue, as I could do that amount of exercise without getting the dreadful whammy effect afterwards.

My various achievements since then have included:

* a 567 kilometre “Great Escapade” 9 day bike ride around the south west of Western Australia

* a Mini Triathlon where I came first in my age group (50-55) and 12th overall.

* reducing my time by half an hour when I did the 53 kilometre “Great Bike Ride” in 2008

* coming 8th in my age group in my first ever 4 kilometre fun run.

I can confidently say that I am not only well, but I am better than I have ever been. I am fitter now than I was in my 20s and 30s. I am loving being well and having lots of energy.

I am still taking glyconutrients, along with these other supplements –

  • an antioxidant to protect my body from free radicals;

  • natural plant-based phytosterols to assist with hormonal balance; and

  • a plant sourced multivitamin and mineral supplement that can be easily absorbed by the body.

I highly recommend these products to you.

For more information about these, go to mannapages.com/suzi, click on Browse Products, and choose Optimal Health. Scroll down to the Health Solutions Starter sets to get the basic four products I take to enjoy optimal health.

I invite you to contact me on mobile 0418 189 435 or email suzimorrisblog@gmail.com

May 12, 2009 at 1:32 pm Leave a comment

CHRONIC FATIGUE – DIET

I’m doing a series of posts to give you a bit more information about my battle with chronic fatigue – what worked, what didn’t, where to go for more help.  I will add to it on a regular basis as I get time.

There is no one thing which provides the whole answer. It is a combination of things that help: diet, exercise, supplements being the main ones, so I will start with DIET.

DIET

When you have chronic fatigue, managing your energy levels is difficult. Mostly, you just run out of energy before you run out of day. I remember thinking to myself that it was like having one of those small espresso cups of coffee and that was your energy quota for the day. Not nearly sufficient to get you through a normal 16 hour day! And when it was gone, it was gone. There was no more energy. You found yourself almost at the point of collapse. So one became very cautious about how one spent that energy, and very focused on ways to top it up.

At the beginning of my battle, I used to eat foods that I thought would give me an energy boost – muesli bars, nut bars, chocolate bars etc. Most of these were sugar-laden and provided a short term energy spike which led to a later (even bigger) energy slump. I realised that they weren’t helping me.

My doctor suggested eating foods which are as fresh as possible – young fruits and vegetables that are just picked. Things like sprouts and lots of leafy green vegetables. I tried this, but it didn’t make much difference to me.

In order to give my body the maximum energy and try to maintain that energy at an even level throughout the day, I started eating low GI foods. This turned out to be one of the best things I ever did, and I still eat low GI foods today. Low GI foods are those that contain protein, are more dense, and take longer for your body to process. Therefore they deliver energy over a longer period of time and avoid the energy spikes that come from eating high GI carbohydrate rich and sugar laden foods. For more information on Low GI eating, go to http://www.glycemicindex.com for a list of foods and their GI. You will also find some great low GI recipes at http://www.taste.com.au/recipes/collections/low+gi

I also eliminated ALL sugar from my diet. I had been a “cookie monster”, loving my cakes and biscuits. I had never had a weight problem and so never needed to pay any particular attention to my diet. I ate pretty much what I liked. However, I hated having chronic fatigue so much and was so determined to get better that I thought it was worth the sacrifice to cut sugars out of my diet. Initially it was difficult, but once you have been through the “withdrawal” period your body adjusts and you no longer crave the sugar. After a while, the sweet treats you used to love are no longer enjoyable, as they taste just TOO sweet. I was quite zealous about this. No sugary drinks at all, no lollies, chocolate, cakes, biscuits, ice creams. If I allowed myself to have even just one lolly it would start the craving for more. Like an alcoholic I suppose – can’t stop at just one drink!

Cutting out sugars from my diet is one thing that did make a marked difference. It seemed to make my body less achey and a little less lethargic. If I indulged and had sweets one evening when we were out to tea I really regretted it the next day, as I felt heaps worse. I learned that it was worth making the sacrifice. Interestingly enough, now that I have recovered I find that I can eat the sweet stuff again without any after effects. I still stick with a low GI diet, but I’m not quite so extreme about eliminating ALL sugars.

Cutting out all sugars is one thing I would highly recommend if you have chronic fatigue. When I met other people with chronic fatigue I would tell them of how much I had benefited from cutting out sugars, but they were horrified and said they couldn’t do THAT! I was surprised at their reaction – I was so desperate I would have done anything to get well, but they preferred to stay sick. Go figure! If you need more convincing that sugar is not good for you, go to http://www.formerfatguy.com/articles/124reasons-no-sugar.asp

I also cut out tea, coffee and alcohol. I wanted to keep my body as “clean” as possible and not give it any toxin load to cope with. Again, this seemed to help, and I would recommend you try it. I drank lots of plain water and green tea (for its anti-oxidants). I really enjoy a glass of wine, but again I decided it was worth the sacrifice to be well. At social events I would drink soda water, either plain or with a small amount of natural orange juice (no added sugar!).  Again, now that I am well I find it doesn’t affect me at all to have a glass of wine.  But while I was sick, it make a big difference to cut it out.

I used to eat a lot of plain yogurt – it is good for your intestinal health. However I discovered much later that although I am not lactose intolerant I actually do better on a non-dairy diet. Cutting out dairy foods seems to agree with my body, and I still use only soy milk and keep the use of cheese to a minimum.

I discovered the benefits of a non-dairy diet while on a liver-cleansing diet. I would never have thought to try this, but my doctor discovered that my liver was not doing well as a result of some medicine I had been taking and he put me on a liver cleansing diet. I was already 2 years into my healing journey by then. I wasn’t happy about this to start with, but it did make a difference to how I felt and it did fix my liver problem. A sluggish liver that is not performing properly can make you feel terrible. So a liver cleansing diet is always worth a try.

What works as far as diet is concerned is a very personal thing. I have told you what works for me, but we are all different. If you want to be well, it is worth trying these suggestions. Don’t make excuses in your own mind about why you shouldn’t try it – have a go and if it makes a difference to you, then you will be glad you did.

CONTACT SUZI

Email:  sumos@westnet.com.au

Twitter:  http://twitter.com/SuziMorris

Myspace:  www.myspace.com/suzi1956

Squidoo lens:  http://www.squidoo.com/HealthOver50

Business Building:  http://sumos.magneticsponsoringonline.com

April 27, 2009 at 3:42 am Leave a comment

5 tips for fast fat loss

flat-loss-girlFast fat loss tip number one: Calorie Intake


Be sure that your calorie intake reduction is not too extreme. This is the old “less is more” idea. Think about it. Put yourself on a starvation diet and you are just asking for a rebound binge. Sure, you may have great will power and will be able to stick at it for a few days, but you will feel deprived, cave in and when you do, chances are you’ll eat a vast quantity of food in response to starving for so long. This is where low GI eating comes into its own – it means you won’t be starving yourself and you keep your metabolism kicking along. You can really eat well with low GI foods.If your caloric intake is too low to begin with, then where will you go when you hit a plateau? For example, a male will be far more successful starting with 2800 calories and dropping 200 calories every 2 weeks as he evaluates his progress instead of starting at 2000 calories and only having one direction to go – starvation, which will ultimately turn off his metabolism and stall his fat loss progress.

Fast fat loss tip number two: Gradual Progression

Keep in mind your current “nutrition level.” Make the changes slowly to ensure success. If you begin with a meal plan that is too extreme then you will not be able to follow it. One of the best fat loss tips I read about was for a client who was eating two double cheese burgers a day to start eating one double cheese burger! Why wasn’t a steamed chicken breast recommended instead since that is the superior choice? It would be too much of a change. He wouldn’t be able to stick with it and would eventually fail. Don’t set youself up for failure. Make a gradual transition to low GI foods by substituting one food at a time until you have transformed your eating habits to something you can maintain for life.

Fast fat loss tip number three: Celebrate With a Victory Meal

It is good to incorporate a “victory meal” to reflect your accomplishment and progress. If you have gone well for a few weeks and are dropping consistently then kick back and have a beer or do something that is “rewarding”. You won’t sabotage weeks of good eating with one “victory meal” as long as you don’t adopt a mindset that this celebration represents an ending. The key is to use this as a reward, refocus and prepare for another 4-8 weeks of hard training and good food choices. It makes it easier to stick with healthy food choices when you know that a reward is coming up.

Fast fat loss tip number four: Exercise Smart

Take care when selecting your exercise program. Too much cardio can actually hinder your results. Three weight training sessions a week and some high intensity cardio should get you seeing results. If you are having to do hours a day in order to just lose a kilo, something is off with either your diet (most likely) or your exercuse program. Also, don’t do the same old exercises, or you will get the same old results! Your body becomes accustomed to whatever you do. Shock it by doing something different – a different activity, different intensity, different exercise pattern, different frequency. Work smarter, not harder.

Fast fat loss tip number five: Clear The Clutter

Before starting any diet program, you should rid the house of any foods that could be problematic. When at home, if you don’t have it you can’t eat it. Consider your home a “haven”. You control what is coming in and out. You may occasionaly have slip ups outside of your home where you do not always have the choices you would prefer, but sabotaging your fat loss success in your own home is not smart. By clearing out the problem foods before you start, you overcome a huge obstacle already. Replace these ‘bad’ foods with ones that are much healthier and will still taste good, so when you do get hungry, you have only good choices available, rather than the old foods which caused your fat gain in the first place. The rest of the family will not only survive but thrive without the junk foods as well.

April 10, 2009 at 2:52 am Leave a comment

GET SOME HEALTHY FATS

The low fat, low carb, low calories diets that have been promoted over the last 10 to 15 years do not work. The Australian statistics on obesity tell the story:

1996 2006
Male 52% 62% (2/3)
Female 37% 45% (1/2)

Obesity is increasing, rather than decreasing. So it seems that low fat diets do not work, and yet many of us still buy into the idea that fat is bad for us because it will clog our arteries and give us heart disease.

  • Fat is a rich source of energy and is important for carrying fat soluble vitamins A, D, E and K which support thyroid function and healthy metabolism.
  • Fats also supply essential fatty acids for healthy skin and have a role in regulating body functions.
  • Fats are needed for proper function of serotonin receptors in the brain. Serotonin is the body’s natural “feel-good” chemical. A lack of fat in your diet can make you feel depressed!

Not all fats are bad for us – fat can make you thin, if it is the right kind of fat. It is about both quality and quantity.

Good fats: include things like cold pressed olive oil, avocados, nuts, fish oil

Bad fats: found in pastries, cakes, take-away meals, potato chips, butter and dairy products (full fat milk, cream, cheese, etc)

So if you’re serious about fat loss, get some healthy fats in your diet.

February 27, 2009 at 12:52 pm 2 comments

OVERWEIGHT but STARVING?

The majority of people in Australia, including overweight people, are STARVING for good nutrition.

In general, all Australians eat way more than they need. However, what we eat does not give our bodies the nutrition we require to be healthy. Sadly, we are eating more and more take away foods, pre-packaged, refined foods with chemical additives and preservatives that are essentially devoid of good nutrition.

Some factors outside of our control contribute to the lack of good nutrition. Even if you make the effort to eat the recommended amount of fruits and vegetables every day, the nutrition in these foods is decreasing. This is due to modern farming methods, where food is grown in impoverished soils with the addition of artificial fertilizers to produce large succulent looking plants which are sprayed with insecticides and then picked green, stored for long periods of time and in some cases gassed to artificially ripen. In 1951, two peaches supplied the recommended daily allowance of Vitamin A for adult women. Today, a woman would have to eat almost 53 peaches to meet her daily requirements.  The fact that we eat much of our food cooked rather than fresh further depletes the vitamin and mineral content of the food.

It is my belief that we need to do two things:

(1) primarily eat fresh, organic, Low GI whole foods. Two good rules to follow: If you can’t pronounce an ingredient – don’t eat it, and if a food was not here 10,000 years ago – don’t eat it.

(2) supplement our diet with good quality glyconutrients, vitamins and minerals to give the body what it needs to be truly well. I use and recommend Mannatech’s products for this purpose.

I really believe that Low GI eating is the way to go. The Low fat, low carb, low calories diets that have been promoted do not work. The Australian statistics on obesity tell the story:

1996 2006
Male 52% 62% (2/3)
Female 37% 45% (1/2)

As you can see, despite all the “diet” advice, obesity is increasing, rather than decreasing.

Low GI eating is not a diet – you don’t have to starve yourself to be slim and healthy.  You can adopt Low GI eating by gradually substituting one high GI food in your diet with a Low GI alternative.  Eventually you will have switched to a Low GI style of eating foods which are nourishing and enjoyable.  This kind of eating can be sustained for life.  There are many great Low GI cookbooks available from Amazon.  Or do a google search for Low GI recipes.  Get inspired.  Get healthy!
low-gi-cooking Contact me:  suzimorrisblog@gmail.com, or leave a comment below.

February 25, 2009 at 11:31 am Leave a comment

LOVING THE SELF

What has self love got to do with losing weight?

The short answer is – a lot!

Love gives us a respect for ourselves and this shapes the way we treat ourselves. If we love and appreciate ourselves then we have gratitude for the miracle of our body and how wonderfully we are made. If we really love ourselves, then we will take loving care of our bodies, feeding them foods that are nourishing and energy-producing.

When we are lacking in self love, we abuse our bodies by adopting a high fat diet full of refined processed foods and empty carbs that are devoid of real nutrition. Convenience foods are the go. We try fad diets, seeking a quick fix to the years of neglect that have brought us to our current state. It is a lack of self love that allows us to eat erratically, deprive ourselves of sleep and remain highly stressed over long periods of time.

In her book “You can heal your life” Louise Hay contends that THE PROBLEM is rarely the REAL problem. We can waste a lot of energy trying to correct a problem, for example being over weight, which is not the real problem. She refuses to focus on excess weight (the problem), and works instead on self love (the REAL PROBLEM). Berating ourselves for being too heavy, feeling guilty about every bite of food we eat and criticising ourselves constantly for our failures is not self love. Louise Hay contends that “loving the self begins with never, ever criticising ourselves for anything”. Tune into your self talk for a while. How do you speak to yourself? Do you sound like a harsh, critical parent, or do you lovingly encourage and affirm yourself? Imagine if you spoke to a small child the way you speak to yourself – what effect would it have on the child? Would it produce a child who is confident and happy, or one who is convinced he/she will never be good enough?

Try speaking to yourself in love. Try acting towards yourself in love. Real self love is a great motivator. You will want to do the right thing by yourself, because you love yourself enough to believe you are worth it.

Go to a mirror. Look yourself in the eye. Use your name and say “(name) I love and accept you exactly as you are”. Repeat, until you start to act as if it is true.

February 23, 2009 at 12:45 pm Leave a comment

Older Posts


July 2017
M T W T F S S
« Apr    
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31  

Top Posts

Connect on Twitter