Posts tagged ‘sugar’

CHRONIC FATIGUE – DIET

I’m doing a series of posts to give you a bit more information about my battle with chronic fatigue – what worked, what didn’t, where to go for more help.  I will add to it on a regular basis as I get time.

There is no one thing which provides the whole answer. It is a combination of things that help: diet, exercise, supplements being the main ones, so I will start with DIET.

DIET

When you have chronic fatigue, managing your energy levels is difficult. Mostly, you just run out of energy before you run out of day. I remember thinking to myself that it was like having one of those small espresso cups of coffee and that was your energy quota for the day. Not nearly sufficient to get you through a normal 16 hour day! And when it was gone, it was gone. There was no more energy. You found yourself almost at the point of collapse. So one became very cautious about how one spent that energy, and very focused on ways to top it up.

At the beginning of my battle, I used to eat foods that I thought would give me an energy boost – muesli bars, nut bars, chocolate bars etc. Most of these were sugar-laden and provided a short term energy spike which led to a later (even bigger) energy slump. I realised that they weren’t helping me.

My doctor suggested eating foods which are as fresh as possible – young fruits and vegetables that are just picked. Things like sprouts and lots of leafy green vegetables. I tried this, but it didn’t make much difference to me.

In order to give my body the maximum energy and try to maintain that energy at an even level throughout the day, I started eating low GI foods. This turned out to be one of the best things I ever did, and I still eat low GI foods today. Low GI foods are those that contain protein, are more dense, and take longer for your body to process. Therefore they deliver energy over a longer period of time and avoid the energy spikes that come from eating high GI carbohydrate rich and sugar laden foods. For more information on Low GI eating, go to http://www.glycemicindex.com for a list of foods and their GI. You will also find some great low GI recipes at http://www.taste.com.au/recipes/collections/low+gi

I also eliminated ALL sugar from my diet. I had been a “cookie monster”, loving my cakes and biscuits. I had never had a weight problem and so never needed to pay any particular attention to my diet. I ate pretty much what I liked. However, I hated having chronic fatigue so much and was so determined to get better that I thought it was worth the sacrifice to cut sugars out of my diet. Initially it was difficult, but once you have been through the “withdrawal” period your body adjusts and you no longer crave the sugar. After a while, the sweet treats you used to love are no longer enjoyable, as they taste just TOO sweet. I was quite zealous about this. No sugary drinks at all, no lollies, chocolate, cakes, biscuits, ice creams. If I allowed myself to have even just one lolly it would start the craving for more. Like an alcoholic I suppose – can’t stop at just one drink!

Cutting out sugars from my diet is one thing that did make a marked difference. It seemed to make my body less achey and a little less lethargic. If I indulged and had sweets one evening when we were out to tea I really regretted it the next day, as I felt heaps worse. I learned that it was worth making the sacrifice. Interestingly enough, now that I have recovered I find that I can eat the sweet stuff again without any after effects. I still stick with a low GI diet, but I’m not quite so extreme about eliminating ALL sugars.

Cutting out all sugars is one thing I would highly recommend if you have chronic fatigue. When I met other people with chronic fatigue I would tell them of how much I had benefited from cutting out sugars, but they were horrified and said they couldn’t do THAT! I was surprised at their reaction – I was so desperate I would have done anything to get well, but they preferred to stay sick. Go figure! If you need more convincing that sugar is not good for you, go to http://www.formerfatguy.com/articles/124reasons-no-sugar.asp

I also cut out tea, coffee and alcohol. I wanted to keep my body as “clean” as possible and not give it any toxin load to cope with. Again, this seemed to help, and I would recommend you try it. I drank lots of plain water and green tea (for its anti-oxidants). I really enjoy a glass of wine, but again I decided it was worth the sacrifice to be well. At social events I would drink soda water, either plain or with a small amount of natural orange juice (no added sugar!).  Again, now that I am well I find it doesn’t affect me at all to have a glass of wine.  But while I was sick, it make a big difference to cut it out.

I used to eat a lot of plain yogurt – it is good for your intestinal health. However I discovered much later that although I am not lactose intolerant I actually do better on a non-dairy diet. Cutting out dairy foods seems to agree with my body, and I still use only soy milk and keep the use of cheese to a minimum.

I discovered the benefits of a non-dairy diet while on a liver-cleansing diet. I would never have thought to try this, but my doctor discovered that my liver was not doing well as a result of some medicine I had been taking and he put me on a liver cleansing diet. I was already 2 years into my healing journey by then. I wasn’t happy about this to start with, but it did make a difference to how I felt and it did fix my liver problem. A sluggish liver that is not performing properly can make you feel terrible. So a liver cleansing diet is always worth a try.

What works as far as diet is concerned is a very personal thing. I have told you what works for me, but we are all different. If you want to be well, it is worth trying these suggestions. Don’t make excuses in your own mind about why you shouldn’t try it – have a go and if it makes a difference to you, then you will be glad you did.

CONTACT SUZI

Email:  sumos@westnet.com.au

Twitter:  http://twitter.com/SuziMorris

Myspace:  www.myspace.com/suzi1956

Squidoo lens:  http://www.squidoo.com/HealthOver50

Business Building:  http://sumos.magneticsponsoringonline.com

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April 27, 2009 at 3:42 am Leave a comment

LOW GI APPLE MUFFINS

I have a great recipe for Low GI muffins, that I make time and time again.  I have passed the recipe for these yummy muffins on to lots of friends and family.  Everyone wants me to make muffins for them, but I simply can’t keep up with the demand.

Besides being Low GI, this recipe uses very little sugar (just two tablespoons of honey across 18 muffins plus whatever natural sugars are in the fruits), is low fat and non-dairy. They are really yummy, so you can enjoy them and be guilt free!

When I go for my triathlon training sessions, I take a muffin with me to have afterwards, as it is a 45 minute car trip to get home and I really need to eat within 15 minutes of exercising.

INGREDIENTS:

1

3 egg whites

2

4 tablespoons oil
2 tablespoons honey
1 cup soy milk

3

2 cups pie apple (1 x 300 g can – no added sugar)
½ cup chopped walnuts
1 cup sultanas

4

3 cups wholemeal SR flour
1 teaspoon mixed spice
1 teaspoon cinnamon
2 tablespoons LSA*

METHOD:

Preheat the oven. Get muffin pans ready (either brush with olive oil or line with patty cases).

1   Beat the egg whites until stiff.

2  Add the oil, honey and soy milk and blend thoroughly. (If you want to you can add some or all of the egg yolks into the mixture.)

3   Add the apple, walnuts and sultanas and mix.

4  Add the flour, spices and LSA and stir gently until combined.

5  Spoon into muffin tins. Bake in a moderate oven (200 deg C or 150 deg C if fan forced) for 15-17 minutes or until cooked.

6  Cool on wire racks to maintain crispy outside, or wrap in a tea towel if you prefer them soft.

Makes about 18 regular sized muffins, or about 10 texas sized muffins.

TIP: They freeze well and can easily be defrosted in the microwave.

* LSA stands for Linseeds, Sunflower seeds and Almonds. You can buy it ready made in health food stores, or make your own by grinding together 3 cups linseeds (flaxseeds) 2 cups sunflower seeds and 1 cup almonds.

VARIATIONS:
–  Use some other kind of tinned fruit, eg apricots, pineapple, cherries.
–  Use muesli instead of the walnuts.
–  Use chopped dried apricots instead of the sultanas.

If you use this recipe and like it, please come back and leave me a comment!

SUZI

PS:  I am delighted to be an independent distributor for the Polaris Media Group.  The company is built upon the belief that, given practical education, every individual has the ability to realize their inherent potential and live a life of personal fulfillment.  Check out their product range:  Click here

February 22, 2009 at 11:28 am Leave a comment

Sugar: the Anti-Slimming Nutrient

Indulging in sweet treats can sabatoge your effots to stay slim.

Treating yourself too often will most certainly…
– zap your energy
– disrupt your concentration and focus
– impair your immune system
– elicit mood swings
– accelerate the aging process
– increase cravings
– contribute to the Dreaded Holiday Weight Gain

Overeat sugary sweets and your body goes into fat storage mode as your body releases more insulin, a powerful hormone that signals your body to store fat.

Sugar is the Anti-Slimming Nutrient.

What to do?

You are supposed to enjoy your food, and if you are too strict with yourself you will find that you cannot sustain your good eating over time. Depriving yourself totally will only lead to more intense urges to over-indulge and make you feel that healthy eating is “just too hard”. Here is a guide to smart indulging that will not derail your fat loss efforts.

1. Have a Sweet Treats Plan
Did you know no more than 10 percent of calories should come from sugary treats ?-That’s about 30 to 50 grams of added sugar based on your calorie intake. The best way to not blow it is to plan ahead and know when you will treat yourself. This will help you stay on track – you have something to look forward to and you are not depriving yourself.

2. Do Not Skip Meals
Skipping meals to “save room” for your sweets treats will only slow your metabolism down, increasing sugar’s effect on your body’s ability to store fat. Instead, eat supportive meals every 3 to 4 hours throughout the day. This will keep you satisfied and boost your metabolism – lessening the effect of sugar on your waistline.

3. Avoid Sugary Drinks
If you want to keep your sugar level in check, don’t waste your consumption on a soda, juice or fancy coffee. Save these “empty” calories for the treats you truly desire.

4. Check your Self-Talk
Rid yourself of self-sabatoging views – such as “I need to eat this, it’s a special occasion, I will miss out if I don’t.” This type of thinking will only cause you to spiral out of control with little to no concern of the choices you make each day. Instead think about what you
do to keep your fat reduction efforts in check.

5. Just Say NO
Be aware of friends, family and co-workers who have a tendency to “push” sweet treats on you. You are not obligated to eat it – especially if it is not in your best interest. You have the ability and power to politely say no. Others do not have control over how you choose to treat your body – you do.

6. Be Mindful
Make each indulgence count by eating with intention. How much of it will satisfy a craving or holiday memory you have. How much do you really need? This is not the type of food that has fat burning qualities – remind yourself of the consequences and keep the indulgences in check.

====================================

This information was extracted from an article written by Holly Rigsby, Author of Fit Yummy Mummy. I have been receiving newsletters from Holly for some time. Check out her stuff for yourself: http://tinyurl.com/b33feu

February 16, 2009 at 12:31 pm Leave a comment

Sugars that Heal??? That doesn’t sound right!

We’ve been bombarded by the media with warnings about the evils of consuming too much sugar. “Sugars That Heal” sounds like a contradiction in terms to us.

It is true that too much of the wrong kind of sugar is NOT good for you. If you need convincing of this, read 124 Ways Sugar Can Ruin Your Health by Nancy Appleton at http://www.formerfatguy.com/articles/124reasons-no-sugar.asp

As with most things though, moderation is the key! Unfortunately, there is a lot of sugar hidden in processed foods that we don’t even know about (unless we’re a diligent label reader), so moderating our sugar intake is difficult.

However, it turns out that not all sugars are bad! The “Sugars That Heal” are glyconutrients – also known as saccharides or plant sugars (very different from the white stuff you put in your coffee each morning). Glyconutrients are one of the most important breakthroughs in recent medical science.

Glyconutrients are essential for immune system function and inter-cellular communication within the body. A study published in Harper’s Biochemistry reported that the body needs eight specific sugars and that only two of them are prominent in our modern diets. (1)

8essentials1
Every cell in every system of every human organ requires these eight essential sugars. We don’t get all the glyconutrients we need from our modern western diet, even when we concentrate on eating fresh, raw plant foods. Some reasons for this are:

– Green harvesting of produce – bananas and tomatoes are green even as they are shipped!
– Agricultural food crops are grown in mineral depleted soils
– The use of synthetic fertilizers, pesticides and preservatives
– Modern food processing and methods of packaging.

We are consuming an increasing amount of foods which are calorie dense but nutrionally inadequate. Look at the average diet of children today – soft drinks, processed cereal, pizza, lollies, fast food and their favorite and often only source of vegetables: French fries. Could this be why we are seeing a dramatic rise in ADHD? Autism has gone from 1 in 10,000 children to 1 in 150 in just ten years. Adult-onset diabetes is occurring at epidemic rates in children as young as eight.

Adults are not faring any better with their food choices, as this quote from the Gale Encyclopedia of Public Health shows:

“It is recognized that dietary behaviors influence the development of many chronic diseases, including coronary heart disease, some cancers (e.g. breast, colon, prostate, stomach, and cancers of the head and neck), type II diabetes mellitus, and osteoporosis. Recommendations for healthful dietary behavior include limiting consumption of high-fat foods, having a high intake of fruit and vegetables, increasing fiber, and controlling caloric intake to prevent obesity.” (2)

The high incidence of obesity, heart disease, cancer and type II diabetes show the lack of success dietary changes are having in preventing disease.

What can take us from this downhill spiral of poor nutrition and its consequences to the sought-after state of vibrant health and wellness? Glyconutrients provide the missing link in nutrition to boost the body’s immune system, and increase energy levels. These “sugars that heal” are certainly a good news story.

You may be asking yourself : ‘What diseases do the glyconutrients treat?’ The answer is: NONE! Glyconutrients don’t ‘treat diseases’, their role is to improve cell to cell communication and thus promote optimal health in your body.

From my own experience having battled with chronic fatigue I know that I had an immediate improvement when I began taking glyconutrients. After continuing to take glyconutrients for four years I now enjoy better health than I have ever experienced in my life before.

Are these “sugars that heal” really a better solution for vibrant health and wellness? I encourage you to find out for yourself. Go to http://www.mannapages.com/suzi if you would like to see product information, or email me if you have questions: SuziMorrisBlog@gmail.com.

REFERENCES:
(1) Murray RK, Granner DK, Mayes PA, Rodwell VW (eds): Harper’s Biochemistry. Stamford, Appleton and Lange; 2000:677-677.
(2) ( Author Info: KAREN GLANZ, JAY MADDOCK, The Gale Group Inc., Macmillan Reference USA, New York, Gale Encyclopedia of Public Health, 2002 found on the web at http://www.healthline.com/galecontent/behavior-health-related/2).

January 31, 2009 at 2:04 am Leave a comment


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